Our Growing Parent Resource Library!

The Lead Montessori Conference in Prague was a bounty of Montessori delights and I was able to bring back (after buying a second piece of luggage!) a number of Montessori resources that make the Montessori method, pedagogy, and principals accessible.

Dr. Maria’s Montessori’s original texts are rich and dense and full of inspiration but understandably we generally don’t have the time freedom to commit to absorbing them so feel welcome to take a look at what I’ve brought back and see if one inspires your next reading adventure.

Emily

Our Growing Collection of AMI Texts.

For loan we have in our parent resource library:

From the AMI Collection:

The Absorbant Mind

The Discovery of the Child

What You Should know About Your Child

Education for a New World

To Educate the Human Potential

The child in the Family

The Advanced Montessori Method, Vl. 1

The Advanced Montessori Method, Vl. 2

Education and Peace

From Childhood to Adolescence

The 1946 London Lectures

Psychoarithmetic

Maria Montessori Speaks to Parents

the Secret Of Childhood

Citizen of the World, Key Montessori Readings

From other Author’s:

Cultivator of the Human Spirit: Revisiting Maria Montessori’s Journey, Punam Bhatia

The Growth Mindset, Carol Dweck

Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Paulo Freire

Recycling turns Musical!

We couldn’t be more excited to announce that as part of their 40th Anniversary celebration NorthwesTel is celebrating the hard work of our 2018/2019 students with a concert by Speed Control!

In the 2018/2019 school year, as part of the NorthwesTel Directory Recycling Program, our amazing elementary students collected the highest number of phone books per student  – not just in Whitehorse but all across the North! NorthwesTel is celebrating our student’s accomplishment with a private concert for our elementary students and their families on Friday, November 15th at 6:30pm at the Old Fire Hall.

Space is limited at the Old Fire Hall so this will be an intimate affair with Yukon Montessori School’s elementary students & their families as the guests of honour.

During the day on the 15th our Upper Elementary students will join Speed Control at the Old Fire Hall for a wicked musical crash course that’ll give them the skills and confidence to open the evening’s concert with a song. It’s gonna rock!

We never cease to marvel at the efforts and accomplishments of our young students.

We’ll done children!

The Most Important Question of All: What is best for the Child?

“What is best for the child?”

This simple question is the frame from which every one of our school community’s decisions should be based. It focuses us to consider if the vision, goals, pedagogy, culture, environment, efforts, and strategic planning are aligned with our grand mission; guiding the child toward their full potential. 

Montessori education is transformation: it honours the child as the key to the betterment of humanity.

No one facet of the school community alone can hold the weight of the responsibility to serve the spirt and humanity of our children. We each, parents, staff team, leadership, and community partners must feel compelled to action.

Take a moment to reflect on what it is you want for your child? What belief in themselves do you hope they cultivate? What kind of community and global citizen do you want them to be? Through what actions do you hope they show compassion for themselves and others? What faith in their community do we hope they hold?

Now take a moment to reflect on the ways we ourselves are helping to realize that vision for our children. We would benefit to ask ourselves if our investments of energy and time align with the path we envision for our child’s future? In what ways are we aligning our hopes for our child with building a school community that helps realize that vision? In what ways are we helping to realize our child’s moral, physical, spiritual, and mental being?

As a community of parents and educators who believe that each child holds the capacity to positively shape the world, we have a moral obligation to our youngest souls to set in motion the momentum that will carry them forward as they cultivate independence, realize their capacity, and then themselves be the change they wish to see in the world around them.

Montessori education is a gift and an opportunity. In Whitehorse, several years ago, a group of motivated parents began the first Casa classroom to meet their desire for early childhood education that aligned with their belief that their child deserved an environment that honoured their humanity. It was through the momentum from parents who felt compelled to action that founded our school. With parent involvement school community has continued to grow as those children have continued along the Planes of Development.

Our school community is peering over the edge of a precipice; we are positioned to grow the capacity of the school to enhance the lives of our children and our community. Momentum from our parent community is the foundation on which our school potential rests.

My own reflection brings me to the immense gratitude I have for the ways I am able to support the spirit of the children in our community by building the capacity of our staff team, Board of Directors, and community partners. I am committed to the admirable vision we share for a school community that meets the needs of our children.

Where do your own reflections bring you?

Big Action Is Easy but Walking The Talk Takes Practice: Social Activism in the Lives of an Elementary Child

Dominic Bradford, October 2019

Greta Thunberg, 2019
Photograph: Michael Campanella/The Guardian

When Greta Thunberg addressed the United Nations on September 20 2019, she stated: “Yet you all come to us young people for hope. How dare you.”  It was a bold statement calling for action by adult leaders from the now famous teenage activist.  It was also a desperate call to action in the face of changing climate events. 

The question I have as a teacher is how to bring the children we teach to this big world with big questions in a way that they feel empowered to going beyond the novelty of marches, banners, and strikes.  What is it inside children that we as a society can connect with so that they can transform big action into daily effective action?  In a Montessori classroom this is a question we ask ourselves as teachers regularly.  More exactly how do we allow children to do things in our classroom that will be an impression that will inform the child in front of us, and the person that they are developing to BE.  Recent demonstrations about climate change show “attention” to a big problem and the children I teach are connecting with it.  What I see our role, children and adults alike in the classroom, is to bring “intention” to actually address this big idea of a global crisis.  What we are doing this month is identifying and codifying how we as a community behave in our daily lives through surveys the children will conduct. This first step will lay the baseline for the children to then make observations about those behaviours.  Then they can work to relate them to issues of climate change. 

I am hoping it is then that children will make the recommendations that they need to follow and then share with all of us.   We can then go on to record how effective we are at carrying out that modified behaviour.  Parallel to this work we will also look at some basic scientific concepts that are part of climate changes.  For example, carbon, what is it, where does it come from, and what does it do?  Likewise we will look at the role of water vapour in the rising of global temperatures.  We will examine those two concepts to bring a scientific understanding to the issue of global warming to balance out the more sociologically inclined events that are present recently. 

It is so positive that Greta Thurnberg has glavinised a population to act, and it is our role now to transform that act through knowledge to sustainable efforts of intention here at home.  Fortunately, as Dr. Maria Montessori observed: “The child is not an empty being who owes whatever he knows to us who have filled him up with it. “  Instead the Child is the number one builder of self.  In fact there is no person existing who has not been formed by the child he once was.

Climate change protest in Whitehorse, Yukon Canada

Hershey Montessori: A Montessori High School Dream

Hershey Montessori School is a leader of Montessori programs and the first in the world to offer a complete continuum of Montessori education from birth-18.

As YMS explore options looking a head to what a high school program at our Montessori school could be we hold with admiration what the Hershey team was able to provide for their community in Ohio.

Many schools around the globe offer an adaptation of this authentic Montessori High School model. Some prioritize the IB Diploma program but still hold close the Montessori pedagogy. Some offer a Montessori-like implementation of contextual curriculum. In any case the goal is lofty and admirable and providing quality high school education that opens doors and minds is the goal.

Poke around the website of the Hershey Montessori School – I have no doubt you’ll feel as dreamy about it as we do at YMS.

Continuum of care at the Hershey Montessori School.
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Montessori: The Benefits.

Montessori education offers our children opportunities to develop their potential as they step out into the world as engaged, competent, responsible, and respectful citizens with an understanding and appreciation that learning is for life.

  • Each child is valued as a unique individual. Montessori education recognizes that children learn in different ways, and accommodates all learning styles. Students are also free to learn at their own pace, each advancing through the curriculum as he is ready, guided by the teacher and an individualized learning plan.
  • Beginning at an early age, Montessori students develop order, coordination, concentration, and independence. Classroom design, materials, and daily routines support the individual’s emerging “self-regulation” (ability to educate one’s self, and to think about what one is learning), toddlers through adolescents.
  • Students are part of a close, caring community. The multi-age classroom—typically spanning 3 years—re-creates a family structure. Older students enjoy stature as mentors and role models; younger children feel supported and gain confidence about the challenges ahead. Teachers model respect, loving kindness, and a belief in peaceful conflict resolution.
  • Montessori students enjoy freedom within limits. Working within parameters set by their teachers, students are active participants in deciding what their focus of learning will be. Montessorians understand that internal satisfaction drives the child’s curiosity and interest and results in joyous learning that is sustainable over a lifetime.
  • Students are supported in becoming active seekers of knowledge. Teachers provide environments where students have the freedom and the tools to pursue answers to their own questions.
  • Self-correction and self-assessment are an integral part of the Montessori classroom approach. As they mature, students learn to look critically at their work, and become adept at recognizing, correcting, and learning from their errors.

Given the freedom and support to question, to probe deeply, and to make connections, Montessori students become confident, enthusiastic, self-directed learners. They are able to think critically, work collaboratively, and act boldly—a skill set for the 21st century.